All information on this site is through my own findings and is believed to be correct.  Any corrections, errors or admissions that need to be made, or artists that would like to be involved in BOX=ART, please feel free to contact me.

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About BOX=ART

BOX=ART is a site dedicated to the history of video game box art/ cover art and the artists responsible for them.

Box arts are profiled from a variety of angles using high quality scans and with the intention of acknowledging the men and women who have played such a major role in shaping our gaming experiences.

Not only for video game enthusiasts, BOX=ART is for all who enjoy quality artwork.


Japanese artwork, first published by Capcom in 1986.

Designed for the worldwide market.  NES version pictured.  

Also available on Amiga, Atari ST, Commodore 64, DOS, FM Towns, PC-88 and Sharp X-1.


>Debut western box art.

>The artwork was originally designed for the 1985 Japanese arcade promo.  

>It introduced both protagonist Arthur and antagonist the Red Arremer, a character who would later spawn its own series.

>The Famicom version (the first console to receive a port) received its own unique and tyipically, cute cover art.  Europe’s 8-bit machines also recieved a unique cover art looking very much like something out of European folk lore.

Ghosts ‘n Goblins

Notable Ghost’s ‘n Goblinsbox arts.

Japanese artwork, first published by Capcom in 1989.

Designed for the worldwide market.  Mega Drive version pictured.  

Also available on Genesis.


>Released early in the Mega Drive’s life cycle, the box art’s dark and gothic representation was deliberatly targeting the more mature audiance Sega sort to woo.

>Logo seen here was first introduced on the above box art (Japanese home computer versions). It would end up being used on many of the Japanese releases.

Ghouls ‘n Ghosts  by Yuji Kaida

Sources and further reading:

>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghosts_%27n_Goblins_(series)

>http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/gng/gng.htm



Related BOX=ART pages.


Japanese artwork, first published by Capcom in 1990.

Designed for the Japanese PC Engine market.

Also available on na.


Ghouls ‘n Ghosts by Yasuhiko Yoshikazu

North American artwork, first published by Capcom in 1994.

Designed for the EU/ NA markets.  SNES version pictured.  

Also available on na.


>The Japanese Super Famicom version would also be dark and brooding, and in stark contrast to the series’ usual Manga style of art seen above.  

>The simalarities in box art tone and characteristation could led one to assume that Bell had access to Capcom’s design artworks or the original box art when designing.

Demon’s Crest by Julie Bell

English artwork, first published by U.S. Gold in 1989.

Designed for the European market.  Commodore 64 version pictured.  

Also available on Amstrad CPC and ZX Spectrum.


>A reworking of the Japanese arcade flyer with the original’s anime look replaced by a fantasy paint job in line with what European box artists were in that period famous for.

>The Arthur character pictured was drastically changed from the arcade flyer version, looking more in line with a tradition European knight compared to a Japanese demon hunter.


Ghouls ‘n Ghosts by Ian Naylor

Japanese artwork, first published by Capcom in 2006.

Designed for the worldwide market.  PSP version pictured.  

Also available on na.


>Artist Shinkiro’s second attempt at series artist after the Game Boy Advance game: Super Ghouls ‘n Ghosts.

>All though all three regions use the same artwork both Europe and North America accentuate Aurther by either enlarging the character art or dulling the background.

>The character-heavy montage used here could be argued a homage to the style seen in the original 1985 arcade artwork.

>Artwork was created using computer art.

Ultimate Ghosts ‘n Goblins by Shinkiro

Japanese artwork, first published by Capcom in 1992.

Designed for the Japanese Famicom market.

Also available on na.


Red Arremer II

Japanese artwork, first published by Capcom in 2003.

Designed for the Japanese market.  PlayStation 2 version pictured.  

Also available on na.


>Sumumu’s second crack at artist duties after the curio: Arthur to Astaroth no Nazomakaimura: Incredible Toons.

>The artist would be responcible for all three of the games region specific box arts (a series first), as well as the two cover arts used on sequel Maximo vs Army of Zin.

Style of box arts have tended to fall in line with either the brash, hectic and colourful style of art used in 80’s arcade promos - Ghosts ‘n Goblins (NES ver), Red Arremer and Super Ghouls ‘n Ghosts -, or demure and harrowing gothic fantasy - Ghoul’s ‘n Ghosts (Mega Drive ver), Ghouls ‘n Ghosts (Supergrafx ver) and Demon’s Crest.  


The series has had an international cast of artists produce box arts. Each have brought to the table their own unique understanding of Arthonian mythology with varied results. The series is also a great example of art styles and content being adapted to suit the format being hosted and its region.  


The Game Boy, Famicom and PSP efforts retain a style of art more suited to younger gamers, the usual handheld base, whilst the 16bit home computers and consoles, with an older demography in mind, have a darker, maturer style on offer.

Maximo vs Army of Zin by Susumu Matsushita

Overview

The long running series although a little underdeveloped recently has had a rich and diverse back catalogue.  




BOX=ART series

 >Ghosts ‘n Goblins

Ghosts ‘n Goblins series box arts.

1986

>Ghosts ‘n Goblins (JP) Famicom.

>Ghosts ‘n Goblins (worldwide) Amiga, Atari ST, Commodore 64, DOS, FM   Towns, NES, PC-88, Sharp X-1.

>Ghosts ‘n Goblins (EU) Amstrad CPC, Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum.

1989

>Ghouls ‘n Ghosts (EU) Amiga, Atari ST, Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum. (IN)

>Ghouls ‘n Ghosts (EU/ NA) Master System.

>Ghouls ‘n Ghosts (worldwide) Genesis, Mega Drive. (YK)

1990

>Ghouls ‘n Ghosts (JP) SuperGrafx. (YY)

>Gargoyles Quest (EU/ NA) Game Boy.

>Red Arremer (JP) Game Boy.

1991

>Super Ghouls ‘n Ghosts (JP) Super Famicom.

>Super Ghouls ‘n Ghosts (EU/ NA) SNES.

1992

>Red Arremer II (JP) Famicom.

>Gargoyles Quest II (EU/ NA) Famicom.

1993

>Red Arremer II (JP) Game Boy.

1994

>Demon’s Crest (EU/ NA) SNES. (JB)

>Demon’s Crest (JP) Super Famicom.

>Ghouls ‘n Ghosts (JP) X68000.





1996

>Arthur to Astaroth no Nazomakaimura: Incredible Toons (JP)   PlayStation,   Saturn. (SM)

1999

>Ghosts ‘n Goblins (JP) WonderSwan.

>Ghosts ‘n Goblins (NA) Game Boy Color. (RF)

2001

>Maximo: Ghosts of Glory (JP) PlayStation 2. (SM)

2002

>Maximo: Ghosts of Glory (EU) PlayStation 2. (SM)

>Maximo: Ghosts of Glory (NA) PlayStation 2. (SM)

>Super Ghouls ‘n Ghosts (worldwide) Game Boy Advance. (SHIN)

2003

>Maximo vs Army of Zin (JP) PlayStation 2. (SM)

2004

>Maximo vs Army of Zin (EU/ NA) PlayStation 2. (SM)

2006

>Ultimate Ghosts ‘n Goblins (worldwide) PSP. (SHIN)

Series box artists.

>Ian Naylor (IN)

>Julie Bell (JB)

>Raymond Fung (RF)

>Shinkiro (SHIN)





>Susumu Matsushita (SM)

>Yasuhiko Yoshikazu (YY)

>Yuji Kaida (YK)

Shinki ro artist page

Shinkiro box art artist page| BOX=ART 80's gallery page| BOX=ART

80’s gallery page

Japan region page

Japanese box art page| BOX=ART




Updated - 25/3/15, by Adam Gidney

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