All information on this site is through my own findings and is believed to be correct.  Any corrections, errors or admissions that need to be made, or artists that would like to be involved in BOX=ART, please feel free to contact me.

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About BOX=ART

BOX=ART is a site dedicated to the history of video game box art/ cover art and the artists responsible for them.

Box arts are profiled from a variety of angles using high quality scans and with the intention of acknowledging the men and women who have played such a major role in shaping our gaming experiences.

Not only for video game enthusiasts, BOX=ART is for all who enjoy quality artwork.




BOX=ART decade

>History - 1994

Whilst certainly not the first year computer art was used as a medium for box art, 1994 would see this art form take a more high profile shape as console cover art designers jumped on board a, thus far, mostly home computer scene. Panasonic’s 3DO and Atari’s Jaguar covered the western corner, whilst towards the end of the year Sony’s PlayStation and Sega’s Saturn the eastern.


The somewhat crude designs seen on box arts such as Hell: A Cyberpunk Thiller and Alien vs Predator would still be technically impressive compared to their respective in-game efforts, but compared to the quality of traditionally painted covers of the era such as Ishar 3 and DOOM II they couldn’t help but stick out poorly.


The use of computer art made sense in the fast changing and tech-savvy video game industry, and all the more so when gaming in the mid 90’s starting to be promoted towards an older demography who were more likely to gravitate towards this contempory art style.


The cost of producing computer art was high in 1994, too high for the freelance box artists who had made their names throughout the 80’s and early 90’s, and many would either move on within the industry to other areas of the development team, or leave it all together.    



                                                                                                                                          

 


Overview

The year that saw PlayStation take its first steps towards domination would also be the year that computer art started to become widely used as a box art medium.


Notable and influential box arts from around the world, 1994.

Dates shown are the original year the box arts were released.

>Click on the images  to enlarge.

Posted - 20/6/2015 by Adam Gidney

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The swelling of development team sizes and their rising costs this generation meant that outsourcing promotional and box art duties was becoming common place.  Handled by design marketing companies, covers could be detached and clinical, suiting the market rather than the game itself.


Traditionally painted box arts were still in great demand and especially on the PC where a lot of fantasy and historical RPG’s demanded detailed paint works that were impossible to recreate using a 90’s paint package.


Japanese box arts would on the whole still be designed by the artists made popular in the 80’s, who didn’t have such a concern for computer art. And even though more and more eastern covers were finding their way across to the Americas and Europe, and vice versa, it was still common place for Japan to have there own region specific covers and the West theres.     








A number of firsts and lasts…

>First SNES box art to use computer art (Donkey Kong Country).

>First wave of Saturn and PlayStation box arts.

>Final Bob Wakelin box art (Central Intelligence).

>Final NES box art (Wario Woods).



Ishar 3 big.jpg

Ishar 3

1994

By Ciruelo Cabral


Doom II Big.png

DOOM II

1994

By Brom


star wars tie fighter big.jpg

Star Wars: Tie Fighter

1994

By Ron K. Lussier


Earthworm-jim-big.jpg

Earthworm Jim

1994

By Doug TenNapel


brandish 3 big.jpg

Brandish 3: Renewal

1994

By Jun Suemi


Phantasy Star IV big.jpg

Phantasy Star IV

1994

By Boris Vallejo


Super Street Fighter II X 3DO big.jpg

Super Street Fighter II X

1994

By Kinu Nishimua


Hello kitty big.jpg

Hello Kitty

1994

By -


sonic and knuckles big.jpg

Sonic & Knuckles

1994

By -


heretic big.jpg

Heretic

1994

By Brom


king-of-fighters-94-big.jpg

King of Fighters ‘94

1994

By Shinkiro


central intelligence big.jpg

Central Intelligence

1994

By Bob Wakelin


wario woods big.jpg

Wario Woods

1994

By -


UFO enemy unknown big.jpg

UFO: Enemy Unknown

1994

By -


Kings quest VII big.jpg

Kings Quest VII

1994

By Marc Hudgins



The Incredible Hulk big.jpg

The Incredible Hulk

1994

By Glenn Fabry


wing commander III big.jpg

Wing Commander III

1994

By Sam Yeates


Alien vs Predator big.jpg

Alien vs Predator

1994

By Andrew H. Denton


ridge racer ps1 big.jpg

Ridge Racer

1994

By -


UFO: Enemy Unknown

Published by MicroProse in 1994.

Designed for the European market.  Available on Amiga, CD32, DOS.

donkey kong country big.png

Donkey Kong Country

1994

By -


super street fight II SF big.jpg

Super Street Fighter II

1994

By Muraoka Satoshi


demonscrest big.jpg

Demon’s Crest

1994

By Julie Bell


Final Fantasy VI big.jpg

Final Fantasy VI

1994

By Yoshitaka Amano


super metroid big.jpg

Super Metroid

1994

By -


Nosteratu

1994

By Jun Suemi


nosferatu big.jpg Ishar 3 box art review page| BOX=ART

Ishar 3 review page

90’s gallery page

Julie Bell box art artist page| BOX=ART

Julie Bell artist page

DOOM series box art page| BOX=ART

DOOM series page


Beneath-a-steal-sky-big.jpg

Beneath a Steel Sky

1994

By -


live-a-live-big.jpg

Live a Live

1994

By Ryogi Minagawa


hell-a-cyberpunk-thriller-big.jpg

Hell: A Cyberpunk Thiller

1994

By Quinno Martin