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BOX=ART: Retrogamer and modern video game box art history.

BOX=ART

Video game box art and artist history database

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BOX=ART copyright ©2013 Adam Gidney. All rights reserved. Hosted by Dathorn.

About BOX=ART

BOX=ART is a site dedicated to the history of video game box art/ cover art and the artists responsible for them.

Box arts are profiled using high quality scans and with the intention of acknowledging the men and women who have played such a major role in shaping our gaming experiences.

Not only for video game enthusiasts, BOX=ART is for all who enjoy quality artwork.


All information on this site is through my own findings and is believed to be correct.  Any corrections, errors or admissions that need to be made, or artists that would like to be involved in BOX=ART, please feel free to contact me.


123 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Box art index - I

Artist index - I




BOX=ART index

 >I

Ico (イコ) by Fumito Ueda.

Japanese artwork. Published by Sony Computer Entertainment in 2001 for the European and Japanese markets.  

PS2 ver. pictured.  Also availble on: PS3.




Click to enlarge

>The acclaimed Ico would be a jewel in SCE’s crown and it’s box art a complimentary masterpiece in minimalism. Director and lead designer, Fumito Ueda would take inspiration from Giorgio de Chirico’s, The Nostalgia of the Infinite, stating “… I thought the surrealistic world of de Chirico matched the allegoric world of Ico”. It would certainly match the game’s mood more so than its in-game artistic direction, with the sense of grand architecture isolating - but far from engulfing - companions Ico and Yorda.

The North American cover art by Gregory Harsh would depict a 3D illustrated Ico in a dull and angered pose. It would be used due to Fumito’s original not being ready for Ico’s American release date, and has been credited for the game’s poor sales in that region. Thankfully the later European version opted for the Japanese original.

ico-PS2-big.jpg

Ishin no Arashi Bakumatsu Shishiden by Ayami kojima.

Japanese artwork. Published by Koei in 1998 for the Japanese market.

PS1 ver. pictured. Also available on: Saturn.  



Click to enlarge

ishin-no-arashi-bakumatsu-shishiden-PS1-big.jpg

Ishar 3: The Seven Gates of Infinity by Ciruelo Cabral.

Argentine artwork. Published by Silmarils in 1994 for the European and North American markets.  

DOS ver. pictured.  Also availble on: Amiga, Atari ST, WIN.




>The third and final part of the Ishar series would see Argentine artist and dragon painter specialist Ciruelo Cabral lend his enviable talents.

Named ‘Flying Dark Dragon’ the artwork was originally created in 1989 and first appeared on the front cover of one of the artists own publications, The Book of the Dragon, 1991.  Developer/ publisher Silmarils then, bought the use of rights in 1994. Styalistically it comfortably bookended the other two excellent Tolkien-themed cover arts.

Painted using acrylic on cardboard, its floating, dream like style of composition and use of cool colours can be found clearly inspired by the art of Roger Dean. Dean along with Moebius, and Frank Frazetta would play a big part in shaping the artist’s early creative approach.

Click to enlarge

Ishar-3-DOS-big.jpg

Illusion City: Gen’ ei Toshi (幻影都市) by Yukio Kitta.

Japanese artwork. Published by Micro Cabin Corp. in 1991 for the Japanese market.  

MSX ver. pictured.  Also availble on: FM Towns, PC-98, X68000.




Click to enlarge

>Yukio’s grandiose and melancholic window into the future, would be imposingly possible due to the space available on Japan’s home computer casings.  It wouldn’t represent the in-games bleak artistic direction, but, the lamenting architectural facade would sorrowfully tell the game’s fated tale brilliantly.

Illusion’s artistry melded both classic anime with delicate ligne claire styles of art.  Inspiration can be seen from artist’s Moebius and Jean Giraud, and even though sci-fi isn’t Yukio’s normal genre, Illusion does still sit comfortably within the artists portfolio.

Sega’s Mega CD would be only console graced with a port, and also the only version to switch front and back covers - complete with 1980’s style Manga characterisation by Mangaka Koji Nakakita - but in doing so offered a far inferior box art both visually and emotionally.

Illusion-city-MSX-big.jpg

Ikaruga (斑鳩) by Yasushi Suzuki.

Japanese artwork. Published by Treasure Co. in 2001 for the Japanese Dreamcast market.



Click to enlarge

ikaruga-DRE-big.jpg