BOX=ART: Retrogamer and modern video game box art history.

BOX=ART

Video game box art and artist history database

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BOX=ART copyright ©2013 Adam Gidney. All rights reserved. Hosted by Dathorn.

About BOX=ART

BOX=ART is a site dedicated to the history of video game box art/ cover art and the artists responsible for them.

Box arts are profiled using high quality scans and with the intention of acknowledging the men and women who have played such a major role in shaping our gaming experiences.

Not only for video game enthusiasts, BOX=ART is for all who enjoy quality artwork.


All information on this site is through my own findings and is believed to be correct.  Any corrections, errors or admissions that need to be made, or artists that would like to be involved in BOX=ART, please feel free to contact me.

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Box art index - M

Artist index - M




BOX=ART index

 >M


Marc Hudgins.  North America box artist.

Kings Quest VII | Sierra On-Line | 1994.




MadWorld (マッドワールド) by Masaki Yamanaka.

Japanese artwork. First published by Spike Co. Ltd globally in 2009 for the Wii market.



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Masaki Yamanaka.  Japanese box artist in 2009.

Madworld | Spike Co, Ltd. | 2009.  





Masaki Okumura.  Japanese box artist in 1988.

Xanadu: Dragon Slayer II | Nihon Falcom | 1988.





Mark Bagley. North American box artist in 1995.

Amazing Spider-Man: Lethal Foes | Epock Co. | 1995.





Mario Strikers Charged (マリオストライカーズ チャージド) by Masanori Sato.

Japanese artwork. Published by Nintendo globally in 2007 for the Wii market.


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Marvel vs. Capcom 2: New Age of Heroes (マーヴル VS. カプコン 2 ニュー エイジ オブ ヒーローズ) by Bengus.

Japanese artwork. Published by Capcom in 2000 for the European and Japanese Dreamcast markets.


Click to enlarge

marvel-vs-capcom-2-DRE-big.jpg

Menace by Ian Craig.

English artwork. Published by Psygnosis in 1988 for the European and North American markets.

Amiga ver. pictured. Also available on: Atari ST, C64, DOS.  



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menace-AMI-big.jpg

Metal Gear.

First published by Konami in 1987 for the global market.  

MSX ver. pictured.  Also availble on: C64, DOS, Famicom, Game Cube, NES.




>Debut box art for the Metal Gear series.

The cover’s character art would be modelled on a Carl Reece scene from the movie, The Terminator that adds an obvious western appeal and probably played a part in the games success in the West.

The “G.I Joe” character art would surface again for unofficial wetsern sequel Snake’s Revenge (1990, box by Tom Dubois), but Japan would drop it for it’s official sequel in favour of a more painterly effort by Yoshiuki Takani (Metal Gear: Solid Snake, 1990)

The box art would get a Japanese exclusive re-release when it was included in the Gamecube’s Metal Gear: Twin Snakes console pack.

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metal-gear-MSX-big.jpg

Metal Gear Solid (メタルギアソリッド by Yoji Shinkawa.

Japanese artwork. Published by Konami in 1999 for the European PS1 market.




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>This box art would be the first in the Metal Gear series to launch Yoji distinctive style of character art that would proliferate box arts up until Metal Gear Solid 4.

The artwork was likely designed using a Pentel Brush Pen and exibits the artist’s freeflowing style of brush work.

The character art inspiration would come from actor Christopher Walken.

Japan and the US would instead get a dull plain cover and title - a rather missed opportunity.   

metal-gear-solid-PS1-big.jpg

Metroid Fusion (メトロイドフュージョン) by Shinya Sano.

Japanese artwork. Published by Nintendo globally in 2002 for the Game Boy Advance market.




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Missile Command by George opperman.

North American artwork. Published by Atari in 1981 for NA 2600 market and later in 1983 for the JPN 2800 market.

Atari 2600 ver. pictured. Also available on: Atari 2800.  



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Might and Magic III by Akihiro Yamada.

Japanese artwork. Published by Hudson Soft in 1993 for the Japanese PC Engine CD market.




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Might and Magic VIII by Larry Elmore.

North American artwork. Published by The 3DO Company globally in 2000 for the Windows market.




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Might and Magic: Darkside of Xeen by Michael J. Winterbauer.

North American artwork. Published by New world Computing Inc. in 1993 for the European and North American DOS markets.



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Might and Magic Book II by Akira Komeda.

Japanese artwork. Published by Elite Systems Ltd. in 1993 for the Japanese Super Famicom market.




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Might and Magic VI by Larry Elmore.

North American artwork. Published by The 3DO market in 1998 for the European and North American Windows markets.  



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Might and Magic by Akihiro Yamada.

Japanese artwork. Published by NEC Avenue Ltd. in 1992 for the Japanese PC Engine CD market.




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Might and Magic Book One by Jim Krogel.

North American artwork. Published by New World Computing inc. in 1986 for the Japanese and North American markets.  

C64 ver. pictured.  Also availble on: Apple II, DOS, Macintosh, MSX 2, PC-88, PC-98, Sharp X-1, X68000.



>Debut box art for the Might and Magic series.

The box art would see a international release on the Japanese home computers, but would miss out Europe’s hardware.

The Tolkein inspired map design would also be used globally for the Book II follow up, and Book III in Japan only. Book II was again designed by Krogel.

Little is known about the artist other than he was skilled in map design, and his time within the video game industry seems limited to these two box arts.

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Mircosurgeon by Michael Becker.

North American artwork. Published by Imagic in 1982 for the European and North American Intellivision markets.



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Metal Gear Solid V: The Definitive Experience by Pablo Uchida.

Japanese artwork. Published by Konami in 2016 for the European and North American markets.  

PS4 ver. pictured.  Also availble on: Xbox One.




>Paying homage to the classic movie poster montage (popularised by the Blaxploitation subgenre of the 1970’s and still used today for the likes of the Star Wars series and the Marvel cinematic universe), Pablo’s cover oozes explosive beauty, through character heavy detailing and striking colour.

Cool grey tones colour protagonist Snake as he merges into Metal Gear Sahelanthropus, a subtle reinforcement of the symbiotic relationship between Snake’s and Gears.  Only to be jarringly cut by the game’s roster intent on injecting vivid colour and chaos.

The artwork was originally designed to promote the Japanese release of The Phantom Pain in 2015, where its deliberate movie poster quality stood out all the more and pronounced the horse’s symbolic flaming V to fuller effect.  

Japan’s box art version is worth noting.  Taking Takeya Inguchi’s original Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain cover, it near destroys all colour and fills Snake’s head with characters as if to illustrate the burdening weight his mind carries.

Click to enlarge

metal-gear-solid-v-DI-PS4-big.jpg

Mission Asteroid by Don Dixon.

North American artwork. Published by Siera On-line in 1980 for the European and North American markets.  

Apple II ver. pictured.  Also availble on: C64.




>Mission Asteroid would numerically start Sierra On-Line’s Hi-Res Adventure series offered as the introductory game #0.  Its box art by space artist Don Dixon would perfectly fit the gravity and loneliness of the game’s mission, and is a standout example of an established artist’s work being used as cover art in early home computing.  Commissioned by Sierra, the artist has said the artwork was a quick job taking him a day to complete.

Created using oil paints, as much of Don’s early work was, its quality would stand tall above the other Hi-Res Adventure box arts, with no small part to the artist’s exceptional detail for lunar geography.

Don would follow-up with further box arts for Sierra before leaving the industry in the mid-80’s.

Click to enlarge

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Mission on Thunderhead by Jim Talbot.

North American artwork. Published by The Avalon Hill Game Company in 1985 for the North American market.

C64 ver. pictured. Also available on: Apple II, Atari 8-bit.  



Click to enlarge

mission-on-thunderhead-C64-big.jpg

Moonsweeper by Michael Becker.

North American artwork. Published by Imagic in 1983 for the European and North American markets.

Atari VCS ver. pictured. Also available on: C64, ColecoVision, Intellivision, TI-99/ 4A.  



Click to enlarge

moonsweeper-VCS-big.jpg

Mystic Arc (ミスティック アーク) by Akihiro Yamada.

Japanese artwork. Published by Enix Corp. in 1995 for the Japanese Super Famicom market.




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mystic-arc-SF-big.jpg

Might and Magic VII: For Blood and Honor by Boris Vallejo.

Peruvian/ North American artwork. Published by 3DO Company globally in 1999 for the Windows market.




Click to enlarge

>Originally titled ‘Myth and Magic 2’ and designed in 1998.

It would be one of the artists final box arts to date and as with many of his artworks it was created using oils.

might-and-magic-VII-big.jpg

Melvyn Grant.  English box artist from 1988-1990.

The famed Sci-fi and fantasy painter who is probably best known for his Iron Maiden cover arts, would have his work reused as box art under Psygnosis’ sister publisher Psyclapse.  All four known box arts were originally commissioned elsewhere, and other than Baal were cover arts for novels.  

Melvyn’s style of art would add a somewhat dark-fantasy look to Psygnosis’ box art catalogue and would sit comfortably alongside the likes of Dean and Jones’ artworks. All four covers were painted in oils on canvas.

Anarchy | Psyclapse | 1990.

Baal | Psyclapse | 1988.

Ballistix | Psyclapse | 1989.

Captain Fizz Meets the Blaster-Trons | Psyclapse | 1988.





Michael J. Winterbauer.  North American box artist.

Might and Magic: Dark Side of Xeen | New World Computing Inc. | 1993.

Power Blade | Taito | 1991.




Michael O. Haire.  North American box artist from 1981-1983.

Dunzhin | Med Systems Software | 1982.

Kaiv | Screenplay | 1983.

Institute, The | Med Systems Software | 1981.

Wylde, The | Screenplay | 1983.

Ziggurat | Screenplay | 1982.





Mitsuhiro Matsuno.  See 326.

Moebius (Jean Giraud). French box artist in 1995.

Fade to Black | Electronic Arts | 1995.  

Panzer Dragoon | Sega | 1995 | JPN ver.  




Mike Bryan. North American box artist in 1988.

Robocop | Data East USA | 1988.





Mick McGinty.  North American box artist from 1991-2008.

3-D Ultra lionel Train Town Deluxe | Sierra On-Line | 2000.

3-D Ultra Pinball: Thrillride | Sierra On-Line | 2000.

Final Fight | Capcom | 1991 | EU/ NA ver.

Final Fight II| Capcom | 1991 | EU/ NA ver.

Monster Bass | Magical Company Ltd | 2000.

Street Fighter II: Special Championship Edition | Capcom | 1993 | EU/ NA ver.

Street Fighter II: The World Warriors | Capcom | 1992 | EU/ NA ver.

Street Fighter II Turbo | Capcom | 1993 | EU/ NA ver.

Super Street Fighter II | Capcom | 1994 | EU/ NA ver.

Streets of Rage II | Sega | 1991 | EU/ NA ver.

Return of the Incredible Machine: Contraptions | Sierra On-Line | 2000.

Zoo Tycoon | Microsoft | 2001.

Zoo Tycoon 2: Endangered Species | Microsoft | 2005.

Zoo Tycoon 2: Ultimate Collection | Microsoft | 2008.





Michiaki Satoh.  Japanese box artist in 1988.

Altered Beast | Sega | 1988.






Mike Koelsch.  North American box artist from 1994-2000.

Earthworm Jim | Playmates Interactive Entertainment | 1994.

Earthworm Jim 2 | Playmates Interactive Entertainment | 1995.

Earthworm Jim: Special Edition | Interplay | 1995 | Windows ver.

Earthworm Jim: Special Edition | Interplay | 1995 | Sega CD ver.

Escape from Monkey Island | LucasArts Entertainment | 2000.

Timon and Pumbaa’s Jungle Games | Disney Interactive | 1995.