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About BOX=ART

BOX=ART is a site dedicated to the history of video game box art/ cover art and the artists responsible for them.

Box arts are profiled from a variety of angles using high quality scans and with the intention of acknowledging the men and women who have played such a major role in shaping our gaming experiences.

Not only for video game enthusiasts, BOX=ART is for all who enjoy quality artwork.


Heralding from those pioneering years in the industry, artist Jerrol “Jerr” Richardson would contribute to Intellivision’s successes with his pastiche rich box arts.



1979

>ABPA Backgammon (NA) Intellivision.

>Armour Battle (NA) Intellivision.

>Auto Racing (NA) Intellivision.

>Checkers  (NA) Intellivision.

>NASL Soccer (NA) Intellivision.

>NFL Football (NA) Intellivision.

1980

>Golf (NA) Intellivision.

>Las Vegas Poker and Blackjack (NA) Intellivision.

>Las Vegas Roulette (NA) Intellivision.

>Major League Baseball (NA) Intellivision.

>NBA Basketball (NA) Intellivision.

>Sea Battle (NA) Intellivision.

>Skiing (NA) Intellivision.

>Space Battle (NA) Intellivision.

>Tennis (NA) Intellivision.















Jerrol Richardson box art catalogue.

Sources and further reading.


>http://www.intellivisionlives.com/         

>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intellivision

>http://www.intellivisionlives.com/bluesky/home.shtml

>Keith Robbinson @ Intellivision. Thank you!



In response to the run away success of the Atari VCS in 1977, Mattel Toy’s new subsidiary Mattel Electronics would design its own home console the Intellivision (1979) to compete with it.  


Jerr would be responsible for the consoles box art layout and design which helped early on to give the Intellivision a distinct branding.


Layouts would all follow the similar pattern of depicting a main scene of action and then an imposed circular window that would portray another.


The pastiche look to his cover arts would be a popular style in video game box art at that point and may well have been inspired by titles such as Air Sea Battle (1977) and Video Olympics (1977) by Atari artist Cliff Spohn.


Jerr’s use of oils would set his box arts apart from Atari’s artist collective though, with a style reminiscing Robert McGinnis’ iconic poster art.



Related BOX=ART pages.

1981

>Astrosmash (EU/ NA) Intellivision.

>Boxing (NA) Intellivision.

>Space Armada (NA) Intellivision.

>Space Hawk (EU/ NA) Intellivision.

>Star Strike (EU/ NA) Intellivision.

>Utopia (EU/ NA) Intellivision.

1982

>Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (NA) Intellivision.

>Frog Bog (NA) Intellivision.

>Night Stalker (NA) Intellivision.

>Reversi (NA) Intellivision.

>Royal Dealer (NA) Intellivision.

>Shark! Shark! (NA) Intellivision.

>Sharp Shot (NA) Intellivision.

>Sub Hunt (NA) Intellivision.

1983

>Advanced Dungeons & Dragons: Treasure of Tarmin (NA) Intellivision.


BOX=ART artist

 >Jerrol “Jerr” Richardson

1981 would see the Intellivision peak in popularity and sales. Mattel Toys and Electronics would split that year, but Electronics without a dedicated visual arts department still farmed out packaging duties to Mattel Toys and Jerr until 1983. By then the realities of the US video game crash had left its mark and Mattel Electronics laid off much of its staff (it would close the following year).  


It looks as though Jerr’s box arts stop at this point, with his final possibly being Advanced Dungeons & Dragons: Treasure of Tarmin (1983).  


From 1983 onwards most Intellivision released games were third party titles and Jerr’s involvement unlikely, but the artist by this time had produced a bewildering number of cover arts for APh Technological Consulting (whom early Intellivision game development had been farmed out to) and Mattel’s in-house development team.


Little more is known about Jerr at present other than he was born in 1928 and died in 1991 aged 63, and that it is probable his illustrative career spanned prior to the 1970’s where he may have been involved in book cover art design.



Updated - 29/12/16 by Adam Gidney

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American box art page| BOX=ART

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70's gallery page| BOX=ART

70’s gallery page

1980 history page

History 1980 page| BOX=ART

ABPA Backgammon (1979), published by Mattel Electronics.

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, published by Mattel Electronics in 1982.

Golf (1980), published by Mattel Electronics.

Reversi (1982) and Space Battle (1980), both published by Mattel Electronics.

As an on-staff employee at Mattel Toys, Jerr would be responsible for the catalogue and packaging artworks that adorned Barbie and various other children’s toys throughout the 1970’s.

Night Stalker published by Mattel Electronics in 1982.

night-stalker-INT-big.jpg

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The history and artists behind the pioneering 1977 console’s box arts.

Categories: American artist